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PREACH THE WORD
October 5, 2013
By admin

Have you ever had the dream of preaching to a 2-5 member church?  It’s harder than many might think.

For the last two months, CAMPUS Residents have had to prepare a weekly sermon. One of the most overlooked aspects of pastoral ministry is the necessity of having to prepare a new sermon on a weekly basis.  Residents are not allowed to use previously preached sermons while enrolled in the program, but must instead produce new messages to be preached every Tuesday in front of our residency staff.

Partnering with the University Seventh-day Adventist Church, Pastor David Shin teaches this module.

The messages presented in this module are not primarily evaluated on performance — stage presence or delivery.  The residents are “experimenting” and “developing” methods of sermon preparation.  In other words, the thought and method is more important than the delivery.  One-point systematic expositions or expository sermons are known to be some of the most difficult sermons to deliver.

The residents are trying to set the tone, lead up to one specific point exegetically found in the text, and apply that point in a modern context.  For the 20-30 minute sermons that are delivered on a weekly basis, the residents have dedicated 15-20 hours of preparation.  While most homiletic courses address the performance of a presentation, our CAMPUS seeks to ground the residents in methodology instead of performance.

For the last two months, CAMPUS Residents have had to prepare a weekly sermon. One of the most overlooked aspects of pastoral ministry is the necessity of having to prepare a new sermon on a weekly basis. Residents are not allowed to use previously preached sermons while enrolled in the program, but must instead produce new messages to be preached every Tuesday in front of our residency staff.

Partnering with the University Seventh-day Adventist Church, Pastor David Shin teaches this module.
The messages presented in this module are not primarily evaluated on performance — stage presence or delivery. The residents are “experimenting” and “developing” methods of sermon preparation. In other words, the thought and method is more important than the delivery. One-point systematic expositions or expository sermons are known to be some of the most difficult sermons to deliver.

The residents are trying to set the tone, lead up to one specific point that is exegetically found in the text, and apply that point in a modern context. For the 20-30 minute sermons that are delivered on a weekly basis, the residents have dedicated 15-20 hours of preparation. While most homiletic courses address the performance of a presentation, this module seeks to ground the residents in methodology instead of performance.

Listen to a powerful sermon by David Shin.

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